To all our valued customers:

Many businesses in our city are presently closed due to the mandatory shelter in place ordinance and it has recently been extended. Auto repair services like Thom's are classified as an Essential Business thus allowing us to to be open and available to perform the needed services on our clients vehicles . We are taking the necessary precautions to ensure proper sanitation practices in our work area and the office, as well as disinfecting the interior of your vehicles upon arrival and completion of work. We have created a No Contact drop area outside of the waiting room; payment can be accomplished via credit card over the phone. We understand that finances are being stretched at this time, but reliable vehicles are a necessity, if funding is an issue we have various option available upon request.For those sheltering in place and would prefer vehicle pick up and delivery, we are able to accommodate you within a five mile range of the shop. These are trying and uncertain times for everyone and we want all of our clients to remain healthy and safe and know you can call on us for support during you times of need.

What to Do If Your Car Has Flood Damage

If floodwaters partially or fully submerge your car, it can mean extensive damage and costly repairs. Here's what to do after the waters recede.

Vehicle Flood Damage Checklist

1. Survey potential damage. Note the depth of the floodwaters in relation to your car. Don't try to start your car - this will cause more damage if there is water in the engine.

2. Act quickly. Submersion in salt water - which is more damaging than fresh water - makes the chances of corrosion much higher. Start drying out your vehicle as quickly as possible, and contact a towing service to get it back to higher ground. Oil, transmission fluid and lube may need draining before a tow.

3. Look under the hood. This is where you'll find clues as to how extensive the flood damage may be. Unless you're an auto expert, you may want to partner with a mechanic for the following tasks: 

  • Check the oil dipstick. Look for water droplets, which likely indicate that there is water in your engine. If that's the case, the cylinders, which are supposed to compress air instead of water, will be broken.
  • Remove water-damage cylinders and check for corroded spots.
  • Change the oil and transmission fluid. You'll want to do this again after the car is drivable and you've gone several hundred miles.

4. Clean the interior. If floodwaters were more than a few feet deep, water probably made it to the inside of your car. Here's what to do next:

  • Remove all moisture. Use a wet/dry vacuum to collect standing water, and cloth towels to absorb water that has soaked into the seats and carpet. Remove seats and seat cushions if possible, and use fans and dehumidifiers to accelerate the drying process.
  • Check electrical components. Extensive flood damage could require a trip to the mechanic to get it replaced.

5. Check the fuel tank and line. Use a store-bought siphon pump to remove some fuel. If you note any water (which would naturally separate from the fuel), you'll want to empty the tank completely.


"What to Do If Your Car Has Flood Damage" (2016, August) State Farm Learning Center. Retrieved from https://learningcenter.statefarm.com/auto/safety/what-to-do-if-your-car-has-flood-damage/

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